28 Mar

BGP Additional Paths

BGP routers only advertise the best path to their neighbors. When a better path is found, it replaces the current path. Advertising a path and replacing it with a new path is called an implicit withdraw.

Since we only advertise the best path, a lot of other possible paths are unknown to some of the routers. We call this path hiding.

Extra notes on additional path command syntax:

  • neighbor neighbor-id additional-paths send: We use this to configure the router so it sends multiple BGP paths to a neighbor.
  • neighbor neighbor-id additional-paths receive: If you have a neighbor that sends multiple paths, that’s nice but you still have to configure your local router that it wants to receive multiple paths.
  • bgp additional-paths select : you receive a bunch of paths from your neighbor but you can still configure your router which of these paths you actually want to use.
  • bgp additional-paths install: this tells the router to actually install a backup path that you selected with the “bgp additional-paths install” command.
  • neighbor neighbor-id advertise additional-paths: This configures your router which additional-paths you want to advertise to a neighbor. “all” means all additional-paths.

Reference:
https://networklessons.com/bgp/bgp-additional-paths
https://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/td/docs/ios-xml/ios/iproute_bgp/configuration/xe-3s/irg-xe-3s-book/irg-additional-paths.html

19 Mar

Default routes in BGP

There are 3 ways of advertising default route in BGP.

Method 1: Using network 0.0.0.0 command.
It requires only that the route 0.0.0.0 is present in the Interior Gateway Protocol (IGP) routing table. This is the preferred approach.

Method 2: Using default-information originate command.
It requires explicit redistribution of the route 0.0.0.0. This protects against someone accidentally redistributing a default route in BGP which could potentially be disastrous.

Method 3: Using neighbor default-originate command.
This method does not require the presence of the 0.0.0.0/0 network in the routing table of the advertising router.

https://community.cisco.com/t5/routing/bgp-default-information-originate/td-p/772779

http://lostintransit.se/2013/06/12/default-routes-in-bgp/

Incoming search terms:

  • bgp protocol default route
18 Mar

VPN Ports

 

PPTP:
To allow PPTP tunnel maintenance traffic, open TCP 1723.
To allow PPTP tunneled data to pass through router, open Protocol ID 47.

L2TP over IPSec
To allow Internet Key Exchange (IKE), open UDP 500.
To allow IPSec Network Address Translation (NAT-T) open UDP 4500.
To allow L2TP traffic, open UDP 1701.

OpenVPN:

OpenVPN uses port 1194 udp and tcp:

Here’s the Cisco access list: (gre=Protocol ID 47, pptp=1723, isakmp=500, non500-isakmp=4500):

permit gre any any
permit tcp any any eq 1194
permit udp any any eq 1194
permit udp any any eq isakmp
permit udp any any eq non500-isakmp
permit udp any any eq 5500
permit tcp any any eq 1723
permit udp any any eq 1701

If natted address is being used by any of the peer then you need to open up the UDP port 4500 for ISAKMP.

If no natting is there then you need to open up the UDP port 500 for ISAKMP

For Phase 2: you need to explicitly open up the port for specific protocol like port 50 for AH and port 51 for ESP

IPSec can use ESP (protocol 50), or AH (protocol 51).   AH breaks if used with any type of NAT with IPv4, so it is rarely ever used in a transform set.

Common Cisco ACL for allowing VPN traffic:

remark Allow VPN Traffic
permit udp any host [IPSec Headend] eq 500
permit udp any host [IPSec Headend] eq 4500
permit 50 any host [IPSec Headend]
permit 51 any host [IPSec Headend]
permit 47 any host [IPSec Headend]
permit 57 any host [IPSec Headend]
deny   ip any host [IPSec Headend]